New College
Wednesday September 06, 2017 9:30 — 4:45


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Get a head start on your senior year! This event will help you prepare for fourth-year courses and assignments and for graduate or professional school applications. We will focus on these essential skills for senior students:

  • How to evaluate research critically and communicate your findings in literature reviews, grant proposals and presentations
  • How to conduct effective literature searches
  • How to identify and communicate your relevant abilities in applications

Lunch and refreshments will be provided!

This event is eligible for Co-curricular Record validation.

Who can participate?

Third and fourth-year students in the Human Biology Program.  Priority is given to fourth-year students.

How do I register?

Registration is currently closed. Check back in August 2018 for information on Science as a Critical Practice 2018

Please note that because spaces are limited you must be available to participate in all the events and workshops

SCHEDULE

Time Event Location
09:30–09:45AM Sign in and Registration.  Refreshments will be served. D.G. Ivey Library Wilson Hall
09:45–11:00AM Reflecting on your learning: From your senior year to after graduation. (F. Taverna & L. Newbery)
How have you developed and matured intellectually during your degree? In this workshop, you’ll work with some self-assessment tools that can help you understand your strengths, identify your goals for fourth year, prepare to address gaps in preparation, and describe your strengths and abilities effectively as you apply for graduate schools, professional schools, or jobs.
D.G. Ivey Library Wilson Hall
11:00–11:15 Break and refreshments
11:15–12:15PM

Concurrent Workshops I

Whether you go on to a career in research, health care, health policy or business, you will need to make and communicate critical assessments of research. These workshops address key forms of scientific thinking and communication that you will meet in fourth-year assignments and in post-graduate, health care and workplace settings.

Registration for breakout sessions will be conducted separately via a BlackBoard site in late August.

How to read (and not to read) a primary research article (M. Papaconstantinou) WE54G
Writing literature reviews (C. Dockstader & L. Newbery) WE54E
Writing grant proposals (R. Wilson) WE54F
Using advanced research skills (A. Kwak) Computer Lab (Ivey Library)
Designing oral presentations (F. Taverna) 54D
12:15–01:00PM Lunch Lobby outside of WE54 series of classrooms
01:00–02:00PM

Concurrent Workshops II

These workshops address key forms of scientific communication that you will meet in fourth-year assignments and in post-graduate, health care and workplace settings. Registration for breakout sessions will be conducted via the Portal at the end of August.

The good, the bad and the fluffy: Different approaches to critiquing science (W. Ju & P. Whissel) Ivey Library, Upper Level
Writing grant proposals (R. Wilson) WE54F
Using advanced research skills (A. Kwak) Computer Lab (Ivey Library)
Designing poster presentations (C. Dockstader) 54E
02:00–02:10PM Break and refreshments WE54 Lobby
02:10–03:10PM

Concurrent Workshops III

How to read (and not to read) a primary research article (M. Papaconstantinou) WE54G
Writing literature reviews (C. Dockstader & L. Newbery) Ivey Library (Upper Level)
Designing oral presentations (F. Taverna) WE54D
Using advanced research skills (A. Kwak) Computer Lab (Ivey Library)
 Break and refreshments Library
03:20–04:45PM

Panel Discussion,

Panelists:

Dr. Ron Wilson, Acting Director, Human Biology Program, University of Toronto

Dr. Andras Kapus, Professor, Surgery, University of Toronto; Scientist, Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael’s Hospital

Caitlin Chrystoja, MD/Ph, D. student, University of Toronto.

Brenna Koehler, HBSc 2016, currently an Associate at a consulting firm.

Library
Drawing on their own experience, our panelists will lead us in a discussion of the core critical skills an emerging scientist or health care practitioner needs. Take this opportunity to think through your own current and future professional development! Refreshments will be served and there will be lots of time for questions and conversation.

 

Panelists

Dr. Ron Wilson

Dr. Ron Wilson  received his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in the field of Cell Biology from the University of Toronto. In addition to his role as lecturer or course instructor since the program’s inception, he has been integral to the development, implementation, administration and coordination of the Human Biology laboratory courses. Dr. Wilson has served as the Human Biology Program Associate Director since 2004. In this capacity, he has continued teaching in the program, as well as supporting the overall administration of the program. In honour of his extensive contribution to the program and overall achievement in undergraduate teaching at the university, the Division of Teaching Laboratories (DTL) established an undergraduate award in his name: “Ron Wilson Human Biology Student Achievement Award,” which is given annually to the student who achieves the top grade from the Human Biology lab courses. In addition, Dr. Wilson served as the Human Biology Programs Interim Director in 2011-12 and is currently the program’s Acting Director.

Dr. Andras Kapus

Dr. Andras Kapus, a cell physiologist/cell biologist, obtained his MD and PhD at Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. He did his postdoc in Toronto (1992 — 1995 with Dr. S Grinstein in the Hospital for Sick Children), and moved to Canada permanently in 1997. Currently he is a Professor at the Department of Surgery and Department of Biochemistry, the Associate Vice-Chair of Research at the same Department, and a research scientist and head of the critical care platform at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute/Keenan Research Centre of the St. Michael’s Hospital, where he also directs the Research Training Centre. His research foci include cytoskeleton regulation, epithelial functions including cell volume control, ion transport as well as epithelial and mesenchymal plasticity as it pertains to tissue fibrosis.

Caitlin Chrystoja

Caitlin Chrystoja is a clinician-scientist in training, currently in her 4th year of the dual doctoral MD/PhD program at the University of Toronto. Caitlin’s research interests developed from the unanswerable question of whether her grandfather, who died from late-stage colorectal cancer, would still be alive if a non-invasive test had been available to detect his cancer earlier. Her undergraduate research focused on early-stage cancer detection through non-invasive blood tests, which led to the filing of an international patent on which she is co-inventor, and which has been licensed for commercial development. Through clinical exposure in medical school, Caitlin became interested in how emergent medical technologies overestimated treatment benefit and underestimated harm. Her doctoral work focuses on developing a calculator to assess the accuracy and predict the benefit and risks of healthcare interventions.

Brenna Koehler

Brenna Koehler graduated from University of Toronto with an HBSc. in Molecular Genetics and Physiology in 2016. Since graduating, Brenna has been an Associate at Shadow Lake Group, Toronto. Shadow Lake Group is a global firm that specializes in Mergers and Acquisitions, Licensing Deals and Strategic Advisory services. Brenna’s current role involves a wide variety of business development activities for clients ranging from early-stage biotech to large pharmaceutical companies on both the buy-side and the sell-side. During her time at UofT, Brenna worked in several research laboratories and was a part of the Payload Subdivision in the University of Toronto Aerospace Team.

 

Workshop Presenters
  • Colleen Dockstader, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream, Human Biology Program
  • William Ju, Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, Human Biology Program
  • Aneta Kwak Librarian, Ivey Library, New College
  • Liz Newbery, Acting Director, New College Writing Centre
  • Maria Papaconstantinou, Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, Human Biology Program
  • Franco Taverna, Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, Human Biology Program
  • Ron Wilson, Acting Director, Human Biology Program
  • Paul Whissel, Sessional Lecturer, HBP

Registration

Registration is currently closed. Check back in August 2018 for information on Science as a Critical Practice 2018

 

This event is sponsored by
  • Human Biology Student Union
  • Neuroscience Association for Undergraduate Students
  • New College Initiatives Fund, New College