– Promoting and supporting undergraduate research

Research skills and inquiry-based learning are essential not only for academic success but also for the basic information literacy that is key to responsible, engaged citizenship. New College is committed to providing opportunities for all students in its academic programs – including New One and Human Biology – to undertake and gain experience in different kinds of research. Upper-level undergraduates may apply to participate in full-year research seminars (or thesis courses) in order to: develop appreciation of research ethics and methodology; gain practice in both classical and innovative research methods; hone capacity in reviewing scholarly literature and writing effectively; and build skills in the communication of new knowledge.

Research at NEW – a collaboration of faculty, the DG Ivey Library and Writing Centre – coordinates the sharing of resources and supports for undergraduate research in general, and the research courses in particular. We offer a series of workshops that address different aspects of the research process and curate and make accessible scholarly and instructional materials, both for undergraduate student researchers and their supervisors. Our aim is to build a community of practice of undergraduate researchers, providing spaces, opportunities and a supportive learning environment in which students can gain research capability and develop as contributing, engaged knowledge producers.

Upcoming Workshops

Choosing your research methodology: What is at stake? A workshop on comparative research methodologies presented by Rachel La Touche, Department of Sociology. November 21, 2017. 3.30 – 5.00 p.m. Room 2007D, Wilson Hall.

Choosing Your Research Methodology: What is at Stake?

Your Name -- First AND Last (required)

Your Email (required)

Your RESEARCH Course Number (required)

Your research topic and research question (just one or two sentences):


Resources from Past Workshops

Resources for Student Researchers

Library and online research consultations for students engaged in research

Booth, W. C., Colomb, G. G., Williams, J. M., Bizup, J., & FitzGerald, W. T. (2016). The Craft of Research, Fourth Edition (4 edition). Chicago: University Of Chicago Press.

 

Resources on the Pedagogy of Undergraduate Research for Faculty Supervisors

SPUR: Scholarship and Practice of Undergraduate Research

Social Sciences and Humanities

Brown, L., & Strega, S. (Eds.). (2015). Research as Resistance, 2nd Edition: Revisiting Critical, Indigenous, and Anti-Oppressive Approaches (2 edition). Toronto, Ontario: Canadian Scholars’ Press Inc.

Reid, C., Greaves, L., & Kirby, S. (2017). Experience Research Social Change: Critical Methods, Third Edition (3rd ed. edition). University of Toronto Press, Higher Education Division.

Wilkinson, C., & Weitkamp, E. (2016). Creative Research Communication: Theory and Practice. Manchester: Manchester University Press.

Sciences

Brown, A. M., Lewis, S. N., & Bevan, D. R. (2016). Development of a structured undergraduate research experience: Framework and implications. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education, 44(5), 463–474. https://doi.org/10.1002/bmb.20975

Chen, D.-T. “Victor,” Wang, Y.-M., & Lee, W. C. (2016). Challenges confronting beginning researchers in conducting literature reviews. Studies in Continuing Education, 38(1), 47–60. https://doi.org/10.1080/0158037X.2015.1030335

Wilson, A., Howitt, S., & Higgins, D. (2016). Assessing the unassessable: making learning visible in undergraduates’ experiences of scientific research. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 41(6), 901–916. https://doi.org/10.1080/02602938.2015.1050582